Category Archives: Housekeeping

Species list_Other

The species list got too big for its rockpool. It is now split into three pages:

Fish(es) are here
Corals are here
Everything else (Rays, Nudibranchs, Reptiles, Crustacea, etc) are on this page:

———————————————————————-

Common name(s): Common Cuttlefish

Latin name: Sepia latimanus

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Perhentians

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Mimic Octopus

Latin name: Thaumoctopus mimicus

Comment: impersonates sea snakes, lion fish, flounders, and crabs; video

Picture from: Kapas

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Common Octopus

Latin name: Octopus vulgaris

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Moalboal

Also seen at:

——————————–

Species_Other_Cephalopods_Squid_Unknown_Family-Loliginidae_P4103152_.jpg

Common name(s): Squid

Latin name: Family Loliginidae

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Surins

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Chiton

Latin name: Family-Acanthopleura-sp_

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Mook

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Crab

Latin name: Etisus dentatus

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Ngai

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Crab

Latin name: Carpillius maculatus

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Lipe

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Hermit Crab

Latin name: Dadanus megistos

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Lipe

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Rock Lobster

Latin name: Panulirus versicolor

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Lipe

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Shrimp

Latin name: UNKNOWN

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Kapas

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Banded Snake Eel

Latin name: Myrichthys colubrinus

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Malbul

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Finespeckled Moray Eel

Latin name: Echidna delicatula

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Moalboal

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Giant Moray Eel

Latin name: Gymnothorax javanicus

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Redang

Also seen at:

——————————–

Species_Other_Eels_Honeycomb-Moray-Eel-aka-Laced-Moray-Eel-adult_Gymnothorax-favagineus_P1125331_

Common name(s): Honeycomb Moray Eel

Latin name: Gymnothorax favagineus

Comment: Juveniles have a greater proportion of white coloration, this one is an adult.

Picture from: Kradan

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Spotted Moray

Latin name: Gymnothorax isingteena

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Kapas

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): White Eyed Moray

Latin name: Sidera thyrsoidea

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Malbul

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Yellow Edged Moray; Yellow Margin Moray; Leopard Moray

Latin name: Gymnothorax flavimarginatus

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Malbul

Also seen at:

——————————–

Species_Other_Eels_Moray-Eel_Zebra-Gymnomuraena-zebra_P7297249 Togeans.JPG

Common name(s): Zebra Moray Eel

Latin name: Gymnomuraena zebra

Comment: Couldn’t persuade him out of his hole!

Picture from: Rork

Also seen at:

——————————–

Eels_Ribbon-Eel-Juvenile_Rhinomuraena-quaesita_P8048494 TK.JPG

Common name(s): Ribbon Eel

Latin name: Rhinomuraena quaesita

Comment: Juveniles are predominantly black; adult females yellow; adult males blue.

Pictures from: Malbul, Tanjung Karang

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Snake eel

Latin name: Family Ophichthidae

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Malbul

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Snake Eel

Latin name: Myrichthys colubrinus

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Malbul

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Moon Jellyfish

Latin name: Aurelia aurita

Comment:

Picture from: Redang

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Sea Wasp

Latin name: Chironex-fleckerii

Comment: Very common. Stings and leaves marks for several days

Picture from: Redang

Also seen at:

———————————
Species_Nudis_Aeolidiidae_Cerberilla_Black-Striped-Cerberilla_Cerberilla-annulata_20141109_IMG_4187_

Common name(s): Black Striped Cerberilla Nudibranch

Latin name: Cerberilla annulata

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Lease

Also seen at:

———————————

Chromodorididae_Ardeadoris_Heron-Ardeadoris_Ardeadoris-egretta_P7297453_.JPG

Common name(s): Heron Ardeadoris Nudibranch

Latin name: Ardeadoris egretta

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Togeans

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Chromodorididae_Chromodoris_Annas-Chromodoris_Chromodoris-annae_P8150208_P1018621_

Common name(s): Annas Chromodoris Nudibranch

Latin name: Chromodoris annae

Comment: Looks similar to C. strigata; C.magnifica

Picture from: Hoga

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Chromodorididae_Chromodoris_Geometric-Chromodoris_Chromodoris-geometrica_20141031_IMG_3008_

Common name(s): Geometric Chromodoris Nudibranch

Latin name: Chromodoris geometrica

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Raja Ampat

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Chromodorididae_Chromodoris_Leopard-Chromodoris_Chromodoris-leopardus_20141124_IMG_7748_

Common name(s): Leopard Chromodoris Nudibranch

Latin name: Chromodoris leopardus

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Bandas

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Chromodorididae_Chromodoris_Ringed-Chromodoris_Chromodoris-annulata_P4110332_

Common name(s): Ringed Chromodoris Nudibranch

Latin name: Chromodoris annulata

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Ngai

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Chromodorididae_Chromodoris_Willans-Chromodoris_Chromodoris-Willani_PICT0138_

Common name(s): Willans Chromodoris Nudibranch

Latin name: Chromodoris Willani

Comment: Seen while Diving, not snorkelling

Picture from: Sipadan

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Chromodorididae_Doriprismatica_Black-Margined-Glossodoris_Glossodoris-atromarginata_P5031973_

Common name(s): Black Margined Glossodoris Nudibranch

Latin name: Glossodoris atromarginata

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Ang Thong

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Chromodorididae_Hypselodoris_Beautiful-Risbecia_Risbecia-pulchella_PC072055_

Common name(s): Beautiful Risbecia Nudibranch

Latin name: Risbecia pulchella

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Bulon

Also seen at:

———————————

Chromodorididae_Hypselodoris_Tryons-Risbecia_Risbecia-tryoni_P4291838 85.JPG Species_Nudis_Chromodorididae_Hypselodoris_Tryons-Risbecia_Risbecia-tryoni_20141031_IMG_3115_

Common name(s): Tryons Risbecia Nudibranch

Latin name: Risbecia tryoni

Comment: First picture shows characteristic “trailing” behaviour

Picture from: Ang Thong, Raja Ampat

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Chromodoris_Chromodoris_Magnificent-Chromodoris_Chromodoris-magnifica_P8160104_P1018564_

Common name(s): Magnificent Chromodoris Nudibranch

Latin name: Chromodoris magnifica

Comment: More commonly has a blue base colour

Picture from: Hoga

Also seen at:

———————————

Dorididae_Jorunna_Dotted-nudibranch_Jorunna-funebris_P5083628 Tao.JPG

Common name(s): Dotted Nudibranch

Latin name: Jorunna funebris

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Tao

Also seen at:

———————————

Egg-ribbon_Probably-Jorunna-funebris_P4250786.JPG

Common name(s): Nudibranch Egg ribbon – probably Jorunna funebris

Latin name:

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Ang Thong

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Egg-ribbon_Probably-Spanish-Dancer_Hexabranchus-sanguineus_P8150175_P1018583_

Common name(s): Nudibranch Egg ribbon – probably Spanish Dancer (Hexabranchus sanguineus)

Latin name:

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Hoga

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Facelinidae_Phidiana_Indian-Phidiana_Phidiana-indica_20141020_IMG_0229_

Common name(s): Indian Phidiana Nudibranch

Latin name: Phidiana indica

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Raja Ampat

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Facelinidae_Pteraeolidia_Serpent-Pteraeolidia_Pteraeolidia-ianthina-AKA-Pteraeolidia-semperi_20141209_IMG_0811_

Common name(s): Serpent Pteraeolidia, Blue Dragon Nudibranch

Latin name: Pteraeolidia ianthina AKA Pteraeolidia semperi

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Bandas

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Gymnodorididae_Gymnodoris_Striated-Analogium_Gymnodoris-striata_20150301_IMG_3988_

Common name(s): Striated Analogium Nudibranch

Latin name: Gymnodoris striata

Comment: Risbec (1928) considered the arrangement of the gills to be sufficient for a new genus Analogium for this species, but this is not followed by most authors. Ref

Picture from: Kradan

Also seen at:

———————————

Phyllididae_Phyllidia_Elegant-Phyllidia_Phyllidia-elegans_20141130_IMG_9604.jpg Phyllididae_Phyllidia_Elegant-Phyllidia_Phyllidia-elegans_IMG_1171 kapas.jpg Species_Nudis_Phyllididae_Phyllidia_Elegant-Phyllidia_Phyllidia-elegans_P1227561_

Common name(s): Elegant Phyllidia Nudibranch

Latin name: Phyllidia elegans

Comment: Many variations exist

Picture from: Bandas, Kapas, Ngai

Also seen at:

———————————

Phyllididae_Phyllidia_Varicose-Phyllidia_Phyllidia-varicosa_P7266246.JPG Species_Nudis_Phyllididae_Phyllidia_Varicose-Phyllidia_Phyllidia-varicosa_20141024_IMG_1371_ Phyllididae_Phyllidia_Varicose-Phyllidia_Phyllidia-varicosa_PB270127 Lipe.JPG

Common name(s): Varicose Phyllidia Nudibranch

Latin name: Phyllidia varicosa

Comment: Many variations exist

Picture from: Togeans, Raja Ampat, Lipe

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Phyllididae_Phyllidiella_Pustulose-Phyllidiella_Phyllidiella-pustulosa_P8102558_ Species_Nudis_Phyllididae_Phyllidiella_Pustulose-Phyllidiella_Phyllidiella-pustulosa_P7044860_

Common name(s): Pustulose Phyllidiella, Pimpled Phyllidiella Nudibranch

Latin name: Phyllidiella pustulosa

Comment: Tubercules (“pustules”) often have pink colouration.

Picture from: Rawas, Bunaken

Also seen at:

———————————

Phyllidiidae_Phyllidia_Black-Rayed-Fryeria_Fryeria-picta_P1197142 89 Ngai.JPG Species_Nudis_Phyllidiidae_Phyllidia_Black-Rayed-Fryeria_Fryeria-picta_PA011273_

Common name(s): Black Rayed Fryeria, Painted Phyllidia; Warty Nudibranch

Latin name: Fryeria picta

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Ngai, Redang

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Polyceridae_Nembrotha_Dusky-Nembrotha_Nembrotha-kubaryana_20141202_IMG_9824_

Common name(s): Dusky Nembrotha Nudibranch, Variable Neon Slug

Latin name: Nembrotha kubaryana

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Bandas

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Polyceridae_Nembrotha_Lined-Nembrotha_Nembrotha-lineolata_20141029_IMG_2244_ Species_Nudis_Polyceridae_Nembrotha_Lined-Nembrotha_Nembrotha-lineolata_20141029_IMG_2246_

Common name(s): Lined Nembrotha Nudibranch

Latin name: Nembrotha lineolata

Comment: Several variations exist

Pictures from: Raja Ampat

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Nudis_Polyceridae_Nembrotha_NoCommonname_Nembrotha-purpureolineata-AKA-Nembrotha-rutilans_20141020_IMG_0221_

Common name(s): Nudibranch, (NoCommonname)

Latin name: Nembrotha purpureolineata AKA Nembrotha rutilans

Comment: Nembrotha rutilans, classified as a separate species until 2008, has now been reclassified as Nembrotha purpureolineata. Easily confused with N. aurea & N. chamberlaini.

Picture from: Raja Ampat

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Blue spotted ribbon tail ray

Latin name: Taeniura lymma

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Perhentians

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Blue Spotted Stingray

Latin name: Dasyatis kuhlii

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Perhentians

Also seen at:

——————————–

Species_Other_Rays_White-Spotted-Eagleray_Aetobatus-narinari_.jpg

Common name(s): White spotted eagleray

Latin name: Aetobatus narinari

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Banda Islands

Also seen at: Kapas; Malbul, Adang, Raja Ampat

——————————–

Common name(s): Feathertail Stingray

Latin name: Pastinachus sephen

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Perhentians

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Whitetail Stingray

Latin name: Himantura granulata

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Kapas

Also seen at:

——————————–

Species_Slugs_Plakobranchidae_Plakobranchus_Ocellate-Plakobranchus_Plakobranchus-ocellatus_20141022_IMG_0834

Common name(s): Ocellate Plakobranchus, Ringed sap-sucking slug

Latin name: Plakobranchus ocellatus

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Raja Ampat

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Seasnake Banded; Colubrine sea krait; Banded Sea Krait; Yellow Lipped Sea Krait

Latin name: Laticauda colubrina

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Lipe

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Cushionstar

Latin name: Culcita novaeguineae

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Ngai

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Horned Sea Star

Latin name: Protoreaster nodosus

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Ngai

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Green Turtle

Latin name: Chelonia mydas

Comment: Identified by wide head, two ‘scales’ (scutes) between eyes; non-overlapping scutes on shell

Picture from: Perhentians

Also seen at:

——————————–

Other_Turtles_Hawksbill-turtle_Eretmochelys-imbricata_vlcsnap-2012-02-12-03h34m23s195

Common name(s): Hawksbill Turtle

Latin name: Eretmochelys imbricata

Comment: Narrow head, single scale between eyes, hooked beak, juvies have jagged edges to shell. Pictures – Juvenile, Adult

Picture from: Moalboal

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Featherduster Worm

Latin name: Sabellastarte indica

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Manukan

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Flatworm

Latin name: Acanthoson sp

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Moalboal

Also seen at:

——————————–

Common name(s): Christmas Tree Worm

Latin name: Spirobranchus giganteus

Comment: __To_follow

Picture from: Lipe

Also seen at:

———————————

Worms_Flatworm_NoCommonName_Pseudoceros-bimarginatus_P4271256 Ang Thong.JPG

Common name(s): Flatworm (NoCommonName)

Latin name: Pseudoceros bimarginatus

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Ang Thong

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Worms_Flatworm_Persian-Carpet-Flatworm_Pseudobiceros-bedfordi_20141031_IMG_2999

Common name(s): Persian Carpet Flatworm

Latin name: Pseudobiceros bedfordi

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Raja Ampat

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Worms_Flatworm_Purple-Spotted-Yellow-Flatworm_Pseudoceros-laingensis_20150226_IMG_3819

Common name(s): Purple Spotted Yellow Flatworm

Latin name: Pseudoceros laingensis

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Kradan

Also seen at:

———————————

Species_Worms_Flatworm_Yellowspot-Flatworm_Thysanozoon-nigropapillosum_20141123_IMG_7588 Species_Worms_Flatworm_Yellowspot-Flatworm_Thysanozoon-nigropapillosum_P4250806

Common name(s): Yellowspot Flatworm

Latin name: Thysanozoon nigropapillosum

Comment:  _To Follow_

Picture from: Bandas, Ang Thong

Also seen at:

———————————

Species list_Corals

The species list got too big for its rockpool. It is now split into three pages:

Fish(es) are here
Corals are on this page
Everything else (Rays, Nudibranchs, Reptiles, Crustacea, etc) are here

————————————————————————

(these images are nabbed from a Tourism Authority of Thailand poster – image credit to them, I will do another one later on).

Common name(s): Cauliflower coral

Latin name: Pocillopora meandrina

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Cauliflower coral

Latin name: Pocillopora eydouxi

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Cauliflower coral

Latin name: Pocillopora verrucosa

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Loped cup coral

Latin name: Lobophyllia hemprichii

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Brain coral

Latin name: Symhyllia radians

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Double star coral

Latin name: Diploastrea heliopora

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Staghorn coral

Latin name: Acropora divaricata

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Staghorn coral

Latin name: Acropora austera

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Staghorn coral

Latin name: Acropora humilis

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Staghorn coral

Latin name: Acropora valenciennesi

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Thick staghorn coral

Latin name: Acropora palifera

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Staghorn coral

Latin name: Acropora aspera

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Staghorn coral

Latin name: Acropora grandis

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Staghorn coral

Latin name: Acropora formosa

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Bottlebrush coral

Latin name: Acropora echinata

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Bottlebrush coral

Latin name: Acropora elseyi

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Bottlebrush coral

Latin name: Acropora longicyathus

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Table coral

Latin name: Acropora hyacinthus

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Table coral

Latin name: Acropora subulata

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Hump coral, Lump coral

Latin name: Porites lobata

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Hump coral, Lump coral

Latin name: Porites Lutea

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Columnar hump coral

Latin name: Porites (Synaraea) rus

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Branching hump coral

Latin name: Porites cyclindrica

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Branching hump coral

Latin name: Porites nigrescens

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Anemone coral

Latin name: Goniopora sp

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Anemome coral

Latin name: Goniopora sp

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Anemone coral

Latin name: Goniopora sp

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Joker coral

Latin name: Euphyllia glabrescens

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Bean coral

Latin name: Euphyllia ancora

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Mushroom coral

Latin name: Fungia sp

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Flat lettuce coral

Latin name: Echinophyllia aspera

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Spine coral

Latin name: Hydnophora rigida

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Bracket coral

Latin name: Podabacia crustacea

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Lesser valley coral

Latin name: Platygyra daedalea

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Intermediar valley coral

Latin name: Oulophyllia crispa

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Least valley coral

Latin name: Leptoria phrygia

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Common Lettuce coral

Latin name: Pectinia alcicornis

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Fire coral

Latin name: Millepora sp

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Fire coral

Latin name: Millepora platyphylla

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Hedgehog coral

Latin name: Echinopora lamellosa

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Lesser star coral

Latin name: Goniastrea pectinata

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Favites flexuosa

Latin name:

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Disc coral

Latin name: Turbinaria sp

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Blue coral

Latin name: Heliopora coerulea

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Rounded bubblegum coral

Latin name: Plerogyra sinuosa

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Hood coral

Latin name: Stylophora pistillata

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Tree coral

Latin name: Dendrophyllia micranthus

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

———————————

Common name(s): Exclamation coral

Latin name: Psammocora digtata

Comment:

Picture from: TAT

Also seen at:

 

Cameras_Stevie Wonder Cam

The (Stevie) Wonder Cam

There’s a cruel joke about Stevie Wonder’s holiday (vacation) pictures.  I forget the details, but it hinges on the fact that Stevie Wonder is blind, so doesn’t know where to point the camera, and his pictures turn out badly.

In late 2014, I took a two month ‘trip of a lifetime’ to Raja Ampat and the Banda Islands in Eastern Indonesia – reportedly some of the best snorkelling spots in the world. As my old underwater camera was on its last legs, I bought a new one to take along as backup. It was a shiny blue Canon Powershot D30.

Sure enough, the old one died after its first hour in the water, so I swapped over to my new Canon. To make a long story short, on the camera’s third time in the water, the LCD display stopped working.  The camera hadn’t leaked – it still took pictures, but I suddenly found myself in the same position as Stevie Wonder.  Without a display, I had no idea of what I was taking pictures of – all I could do was point the thing in the general direction and hope for the best.

Look – here’s a nice, close-up shot of a Black-tip:
zMisc_Wondercam_IMG_1467.JPG
Just the tip.

To make things worse, when it broke it was set on “focus on the centre of the screen”, so if I did chance to get a fish somewhere in frame, it would be all blurry, because the camera was trying to focus 30 metres away – out in the blue somewhere.

My  attempts to fabricate a physical frame which would project a pyramid out-front to predict where the edges of the picture would be proved to be fruitless.  This is difficult to do in bamboo (and probably explains the lack of a Papuan space-program). So all I was left with was “point and hope”.

 

The point of this little story is that the pictures on this site from Raja Ampat, the Lease Islands and the Banda Islands are a bit rubbish.

The other point of this story is don’t buy Canon cameras!

 

edit: Update: At the end of the trip I took it for repair in KL, Malaysia (the town where I bought it). The Canon service centre was waaay out of town, so it cost me 1/10th the cost of the camera just to get there. When I got there, I was told that they can’t service underwater cameras anywhere in Malaysia and that I would have to pay one-quarter of cost of the camera to send it to Singapore.  After much stomping of feet, they agreed to ship it there for free. In the end, they gave me a new one.  I suspect it never went to Singapore. So far (with a week of active (underwater) service under its belt) , the replacement has been OK.

East Indonesia_Commonfish

This is a gallery of common reef fish that you will find most places around Sulawesi and points further East, in Indonesia. Hold your mouse over the pictures to see their names at the bottom of the screen.

For more information about them, checkout the specieslist.

Species_Fish_Damselfish_Whitebelly-Damselfish-AKA-Yellowbelly-Damselfish_Amblyglyphidodon-leucogaster_P8150148_P1018553 Species_Fish_Butterflyfish_Pyramid_Butterflyfish_Hemitaurichthys-polylepis_P6274394 Species_Fish_Butterflyfish_Blacklip-Butterflyfish-AKA-Brown-Butterflyfish_Chaetodon-kleinii_IMG_0430

Species_Fish_Damsel_Bengal-Sergeant-Major_Abudefduf-bengalensis_P5122911_ Species_Fish_Wrasse_Moon-Wrasse-AKA-Crescent-Wrasse_Thalassoma-lunare_P5062463_ Species_Fish_Needlefish_Reef-Needlefish_Strongylura-incisa_ Species_Fish_Parrotfish_Yellow-Barred-Parrotfish_Scarus-dimidiatus_P8051578_ Damselfish_Reticulated-Dascyllus_Dascyllus-reticulatus_P7297341.JPG Damselfish_Andaman-Damsel_Pomacentrus-alleni_P1253353_.JPG

Species_Fish_Snapper_Checkered-Snapper_Lutjanus-decussatus_IMG_0836_ Species_Fish_Surgeonfish_Moorish-Idol_Zanclus-cornutus_P5042331_new Species_Fish_Wrasse_Redbreasted-Wrasse_Cheilinus-fasciatus_P8092134

Species_Fish_Surgeonfish_Black-Surgeonfish_Acanthurus-Gahhm_P5183427_ Surgeonfish_Japanese-Surgeonfish_Acanthurus-japonicus_P7075317.jpg Surgeonfish_Mimic-Surgeonfish_Acanthurus-pyroferus_P7105753.jpg Species_Fish_Surgeonfish_Unicornfish_Sleek-Unicornfish-AKA-Blacktongue-Unicornfish_Naso-hexacanthus_P8038087

Species_Fish_Butterflyfish_Eight-Banded-Butterflyfish_Chaetodon-octofasciatus_IMG_1475 Species_Fish_Butterflyfish_Chevroned-Butterflyfish_Chaetodon-trifascialis_IMG_1473_ Species_Fish_Butterflyfish_Eastern-triangular-butterflyfish_Chaetodon-baronessa_PC180405_ Species_Fish_Butterflyfish_Redfin-Butterflyfish_Chaetodon-lunulatus_P7051703_ Butterflyfish_Bannerfish_Longfin-Bannerfish_Heniochus-acuminatus_P4154199_.JPG Butterflyfish_Vagabond-Butterflyfish_Chaetodon-vagabundus_P4041687_.jpg Butterflyfish_Latticed-Butterflyfish_Chaetodon-rafflesi_P7287224 Togeans.JPG Butterflyfish_Meyers-Butterflyfish_Chaetodon-meyeri_P4113530_.JPG Species_Fish_Butterflyfish_Bannerfish_Phantom-Bannerfish_Heniochus-pleurotaeniaP4154207_Surin

Flutemouth_Smooth-flutemouth_Fistularia-commersonii_P7034790 Bunaken.JPG Wrasse_Blackspot-Cleaner-Wrasse_Labroides-pectoralis_P6274391.jpg Trumpetfish_Chinese-Trumpetfish_Aulostomus-chinensis_P6274420.jpg Snapper_Midnight-Snapper_Macolor-macularis_P7297375.jpg

Species_Fish_Nemo_False-Clown-Anemonefish_Amphiprion-percula_P7060214 Nemo_Anemonefish_Spinecheek-Anemonefish_Premnas-biaculeatus_P7095529.JPG Species_Fish_Nemo_Pink-Skunk-Anemonefish_Amphiprion-perideraion_P8020845_ Species_Fish_Nemo_Clarkes_Anemonefish_Ampihiprion-clarkii_P7051669_

Triggerfish_Titan_Balistoids-viridescens_P7276893 Togeans.JPG Species_Fish_Triggerfish_Orange-Lined-Triggerfish_Balistapus-undulatus_P4133859_ Species_Fish_Triggerfish_Redtooth-Triggerfish-AKA_Black-Triggerfish_Odonus-niger_P6180268_ Species_Fish_Triggerfish_Blackpatch-Triggerfish_Rhinecanthus-verrucosus_P6281032_ Triggerfish_Indian-Triggerfish_Melichthys-indicus_P4092827_.jpg

 

Fusilier_Bluestreak-Fusilier_Pterocaesio-tile_P6274522.jpg Fusilier_Lunar-Fusilier_Caesio-Lunaris_P4082554_.JPG Lionfish_Common-Lionfish_Pterois-volitans_P5022613_.JPG Hawkfish_Freckled-Hawkfish_Paracirrhites-forsteri_P6274418.jpg Species_Fish_Pufferfish_Blackspotted-Pufferfish-Aothon-nigropunctanus_P3210955_

Rabbitfish_Coral-Rabbitfish_Siganus-corallinus_P4051828_.JPG Species_Fish_Rabbitfish_Virgate-Rabbitfish_Siganus-virgatus_P8061773 Species_Fish_Rabbitfish_Gold-Saddle-Rabbitfish_Siganus-guttatus_P3190515_

Species_Fish_Wrasse_Blackedge-Thicklip-Wrasse_Hemigymnus-melapterus_IMG_1790_

 

More fish.

This page was just for the commonly occurring reef fish. There are plenty of others not mentioned here. Other species appear on the pages for the individual islands.

Click on Nemo’s nose at the top of the page for the main index.

Snorkelling from kayaks

Having covered most areas that I can reach by swimming, I have recently taken to renting kayaks to increase my range, then snorkelling by jumping out the side of the kayak.
Here are some boy-scout tips if you are planning on renting a tourist kayak and taking the whole day to paddle-out to that little rock on the distant horizon.    If you’re just pootling around off the beach, none of this is applies.

Beforehand

Sea conditions
Obviously, don’t go out in the first place if the sea conditions are unfavourable. Stay within your limits. It’s good practice to tell someone where you are going and when you will be back.

Your kayak
Most tourist rental kayaks are meant for sculling around off the beach, or up a local river.  They might not be suitable to take out on the open sea.

Generally, tourist kayak design is a moulded fully-enclosed plastic-shell, filled with air and having drain holes/plugs at either end. You just sit on top of it, on moulded ‘seats’.  Check out your boat before you use it. Are there any cracks in the plastic?  Are the proper bungs in the drain holes?  When you get out in choppy water, is water going to splash inside any of the openings and fill the kayak with water?  Check for any water already inside the hull.

When you eventually get to your destination and go snorkelling, you will want to tie-up your kayak to a mooring buoy or, if there is a current, tow it around with you, so you’ll need a decent length of line (say 3 metres) tied to the bow of the boat.  In life – you can’t have too much string/line.  You can find 3mm nylon line washed up on the rocks/beach in most places. Or carry some around with you (you can also use it to hang up your hammock!).

I tie the paddle to the kayak.  Most paddles float these days, but while you are swimming around looking at the pretty fishies, you don’t want your paddle to fall off the kayak and get blown a kilometre away, where you can’t see it because of the choppy water.  Make the line long enough that you can still use the paddle without untying it.

On the subject of paddles, if you can, try and choose one with those little plastic rings on the pole.  When you are paddling along – each time you take the blade out of the water, the salty-water will run down the pole and splash off your hands and into your eyes.  This gets pretty tedious after a few hours.  The little rings on the pole try to keep the water off you.

You will probably want to take a few belongings along with you.  Use line/string to tie the bag to the boat, in case you tip over.

Learn a few knots so that what gets tied up, stays tied up and that you can untie it when you want to.

Baggage

What stuff are you taking along?  Make it as little as possible.

There is always a chance that the kayak will tip over, so think about whether the stuff you are taking will (1) be damaged by sea water (2) sink like a stone before you can get to it.

Take enough drinking water, in screw-top bottles.  Drink a bit out of each bottle, so they contain air and will float. If you have an underwater camera, take fresh water to rinse it between snorks – the hot sun will soon crystallise the salt from the seawater in its delicate nooks and crannies.  Take sun block and hats, clothes, etc for sun protection.  Going for the whole day? – I take some rice along in the Tupperware box that I usually carry my mask in.  Maybe take a bit of cash with you in case of demands for National Park fees or to make a donation to someone who helps you out of a tricky situation.

Bringing dry-cameras/cellphones?  Well, this is up to you, but plan for them getting dropped in seawater. Have you got one of those waterproof bags ?   Have you ever tested it?   Put some dry toilet paper in it then seal it up and swim round with it for half an hour and see just how ‘waterproof’ it really is.

Spare camera battery ?  – Get a small Tupperware container for it.  Then it is waterproof and it floats.

Most stuff that you take on a kayak is going to get wet, so just accept it.  I suggest collecting everything together in a plastic bag then tying that (with a piece of string) to the kayak.  It just means that if you tip over, you only have one thing to worry about, instead of ten, Maybe keep a bottle of water and some sun cream outside the bag, for easy access.

Life on the ocean wave

The tropical sun in the middle of the day is a bastard. In a kayak, it is not just the rays beating down on your head that you have to consider –It is those being reflected up from the surface of the sea, too.  Wear that peaked cap, but realise that it isn’t going to be enough by itself.

You face and nose is going to get fried.  I don’t have zinc crème and I’m still experimenting with ways to stop getting my face sizzled.  Those fullface/balaclava hats that you see road-builders wearing are a good start. But mine gets heavy and reveals my nose when it gets wet. Airline eyemasks positioned over the nose seem a reasonable solution to nose protection.

Obviously, wear sun crème on any exposed skin.

I wear a long sleeved shirt and long shorts.  But I always manage to get the inside of my knees burned. I can’t emphasise enough how much you need to cover-up/protect every square inch of skin if you are going to be in a kayak in the middle of the day.

Going over ?

There is a chance your kayak will be flipped upside-down as you are paddling along – maybe by a wave or just a bit of a bad balance.    Decide beforehand what your priorities will be if it happens. Which belongings are you are going to chase-after first? You’ll get nowhere if you can’t see under water, so keep your mask dangling round your neck while you are paddling.  Putting it on will probably be priority #1.  If you have fins, keep them on while you are paddling the kayak.  You’ll look stupid, but you’ll instantly be more agile underwater and it is one (well, two) fewer things to chase as they sink to the murky depths.

You’ve got valuables like room keys and waterproof cameras tied to you or in zipped-up pockets already, right?

After that, it should be a simple matter of chasing round after your plastic bag of suncremes and drinking water.

Turning a kayak the right way up should be reasonably easy – from halfway along it, climb up on top of the hull, grab the kayak on the other side, below the waterline, then fall backwards into the sea, turning the kayak the right way up as you go.

Arrivals lounge

So you have arrived at the spot you want to snorkel at. First, make a note of the wind – how strong is it and which direction is it coming from. Are there mooring buoys?  Are you intending to use them?

If there is an option to tie the kayak to a buoy and come back to it after you have finished snorkelling, you need to figure out what the current is doing.  If there is a strong current, then it would be unwise to tie your transportation to a stationery buoy that you won’t be able to swim back to (against the current).

If there is a current, you will need to tow the kayak around while snorkelling, so that you and it are in the same place when you want to get out again.

If there is a current and you want to look at a particular feature (like a small rocky island), you need to start at the up-stream side of it, so that the current does all the work – taking you (and the kayak) along the length of it.

You probably won’t know whether there is any current until you get in the water, so expect to have an initial dip into the water to figure out the current.  You might need to get straight out again, to paddle the kayak to a better position before you start your actual snorkel.

Getting on and off

So how do you get from the kayak to the sea in deep water without tipping over the kayak?

Off
Put on your mask/snorkel/fins while you are in the kayak.  Throw the paddle off the side (it’s tied to the kayak, remember?) then dangle your feet off the side of the kayak.  It’s a bit of a knack, but try to use your two hands to lift your butt off the seat and slide into the water at the same time.  If you are going to the right, you bend your right elbow as you go in, to keep the kayak level.  When you are in the sea, put the paddle back on the kayak, lengthwise.

On
You probably won’t be able to get back on the kayak from the side without tipping your belongings into the sea.  It’s best to come up over the back (stern), but if your belongings are stored there, you can come up over the front (bow), too.   You are looking to haul yourself up with one leg on each side of the kayak; and the kayak between your legs like a huge, yellow penis. To start, throw the paddle into the sea (it’s still tied on, right?), then position yourself at the end of the kayak. Pull the tip of the kayak underwater then haul yourself (face down) on top of it. Keep your body as low as possible. If necessary, keep your legs splayed out for balance.  Keep hauling yourself (face-down) along the length of the kayak until you reach the seat.  Only then, try to roll-over and sit upright.  Roll-over in small stages, holding on to the sides of the kayak, lifting up your midriff as necessary.

So, assuming you’ve got in the water, figured out the current and paddled your kayak to where you want to be, you’re ready to snorkel.  Drop back in the water again.

If you are tying-up to a buoy – do it from in the water and use the line you tied to the bow/stern of the kayak, not the middle.  Be aware that the tide might rise/fall while you are there, so leave enough slack. Also leave a long enough line for other boats (e.g. tourist long-tail boats) to tie-up on the same buoy.  While you are snorkelling, have a look back occasionally to see that your kayak is still there and that you will be able to swim back to it when the time comes.

If there is a current, don’t tie your boat up – keep it with you.  If there’s a current and no wind, you can probably just let you and the boat drift along on the same current while you dive-down to look at the reef.  The worst case is if there is a strong underwater current taking you in one direction and a surface-wind taking the kayak in the opposite direction.   You really don’t want to get separated from your boat.  If you have currents and winds going in different directions, hold on to the line (that you tied to the kayak) at all times, towing it round like a dog on a lead/leash.  Obviously this limits the depths can dive, so to the longer the line, the better.

Do you want to look at both sides of the island?  Simple – kayak to the upstream end of the island, jump in the water and drift down one side of the island.  They get back in the kayak, paddle back up to the upstream end then jump and drift down the other side of the island.

–    – –
Well, that’s about all I’ve got on the subject.  It sounds a bit scary-mary, but the point is that if you plan for risks, then they won’t happen.

o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
A couple of kayakey stories.

I once stayed at a small island on the very far west of Thailand.  On the horizon (about 30 km away), you could see the enticing looking islands of Southern Myanmar.   Three French kids decided that they were going to use the resort’s rental kayaks to go over there.   They were eventually picked up by a Myanmar immigration boat. Myanmar immigration beat-up on Thailand immigration.  Thailand immigration looked embarrassed and beat-up the resort owners. There were only the two owners of the resort and they had to close-up for a week while they went back to the mainland to get a telling-off from immigration.  The French kids got sent back to France.

Another lad took a kayak to do a trip around the island.  He was intending to stay out overnight and sleep on a beach.  But he didn’t tell anyone that this was his plan.  The sea was pretty rough and the resort owners spent the whole evening chasing around the island, trying to find out his contact details and whether anybody knew where he was. There was talk of calling out search parties, and/or his embassy or parents to report him missing. He was eventually spotted on the remote, other side of the island about 10am the next day, blissfully paddling away on the second half of his adventure.  If you are planning on taking a rental kayak overnight, it seems pretty obviously that you should tell the owners of your intentions.  Just be sensible.

————————

Written: Feb 2014

Thailand_TarutaoParkGeneral

Tarutao National Park, Thailand

Tarutao Marine National Park is a large nature conservation area in South West Thailand.

002_Location-map-1.jpg

The park has five large islands and numerous smaller ones.

Detailed information about the snorkelling on each island is given in these pages:

Ko Tarutao, Ko Lipe, Ko Adang, Lipe environs, Ko Rawi

This page is to give summary information about the entire park.

For now, it mainly contains whole-park maps, but later on, I may add some information on History, Geology and Stuff.

Maps:

Thai_ParkTarutao_011_Map1-Mainmap_P2180829_.jpg
All images on this site are clickable for bigger versions

This is the big-daddy map. I slavishly copied it from one painted on a wall inside the main Park office on Koh Tarutao.  If you click-to-expand it, then zoom-in enough, you can see probably the most comprehensive list of names of places around the park.

That said, it is pretty old and there are some differences between it and newer maps.  In case you are looking in detail, notable differences I have found are:

1 “Also known as”:
Near Ko Adang:
Some maps call Ko Bitsi – “Ko Lek”;
Ko Bura is more often called “Ko Hin Ngam Noi” (เกาะหินงามหน่อย);
Ko Kata is more often called “Ko Yang” (เกาะยาง);

Near Ko Dong:
Ko Dong itself is sometimes called “Ko Batorng/Butang” (เกาะบาตอง/บูตัง);
Ko Raba is usually called “Ko Peung” (เกาะผึ้ง)
One map calls Ko Sarang – “Ko Chamuang” (เกาะชามวง)
I remain confused about Ko So Mong (ซวมวง) and Ko Sa Mong (ซามวง). It might be a legibility issue.

Near Ko Lipe:
Ko Tarang is also known as “Ko Talang”  and “Ko Talak”;
Ko Kla is usually known as “Ko Kra”
Ko Bung Kang is also known as “Hin Khao” (หินขาว)

2 “Too many/too few” islands:
Near Ko Adang:
The un-named small islands south of Ko Bitsi, may be called Ko Sai (to the West) and Ko Talu (to the South-East)

Near Ko Dong:
The island immediately to the East of Ko Dong is un-named on the NP map and also on many other maps. On a few maps (including a Government nautical chart), it is labelled “Ko Lokoi”. The NP map puts Ko Lokoi further to the South. One other map calls this more Southerly island “Ko Ling Kao”.
Ko Hin Sorn (เกาะหินซ้อน) seems to be immediately to the West of Ko Sa Mong, but it is not mentioned on the NP map;

Near Ko Lipe:
There is a Ko Usen close to the South end of the East coast of Ko Lipe

.

Thai_ParkTarutao_012_Map2_P1030323_.jpg
Here is the official bill-board version of the National Park and most of its major attractions.

.

Thai_ParkTarutao_015_Map3_P2110151_.jpg
Here is a fun topological one from the National Park Headquarters in Ko Tarutao

.

Thai_ParkTarutao_016_Map5-Urak-Lawoi-Migration_P1110069_.jpg
and the migration path of the Urak Lawoi – the original settlers – from Indonesia (picture from the school wall at Ko Lipe)

Other maps: 1 2 3

There are more, zoomed-in maps on the detailed island pages.

That’s all for now – here are a couple of interesting links:

1 Wikipedia

2 Some history from a Ko Lipe travel agent
welovekohlipe.com/about-koh-lipe/view/the-history-of-koh-lipe/

3 UNESCO history of the Urak Lawoi people  (110 page pdf, 13MB)

———————————————————————————————

Written: Feb 2014    .     Last Updated: Feb 2014

Recent updates

currently on the road – expect a big batch of new listings (especially Philippines and Eastern Indonesia) in July/August 2017…..

20 November 2016 Updated the new Thailand National Parks website URL in Tarutao, Surins, Similan, Adang, Ang Thong

7 October 2016 Added new section on Nusa Lembongan, Indonesia

6 September 2016 Added new section on Bali, Indonesia

12 January 2016 Added new section on Banda Islands, Indonesia

25 November 2015 Added new section on Pulau Weh, Indonesia

10 November 2015 Added new section on Raja Ampat, Indonesia

26 August 2015 Added new section on Phi Phi Don, Thailand

13 August 2015 Added 30 new nudibranchs to specieslist

23 March 2015 Updated Ko Kradan. added 70 new photos.

29 December 2014 Added 60 fish to the Specieslist

10 October 2014 Added new ‘rough-and-ready’ section on Ang Thong, Thailand

27 Sep 2014 Added new section on Wakatobi, Indonesia

15 Sep 2014 Added 80 fish to specieslist

11 July 2014 Added new ‘rough-and-ready’ section on Bunaken, Indonesia

18 April 2014 Updated Ngai

3 April 2014 Updated Kradan and Lipe, Thailand. Added detail maps to Tao, Thailand

3 April 2014 Added new ‘rough-and-ready’ section on Similans, Thailand

3 April 2014 Added new sections on Philippines – Apo Island, Moalboal, Oslob, Siquijor

28 March 2014 Added new section on Rawa islands

28 March 2014 Added new section on Perhentians

1 Mar 2014 Added new section on Ko Pha Ngan

28 Feb 2014 Added new section on Ko Tao

22 Feb 2014 Added new section on ‘tips for Snorkelling from Kayaks’

20 Feb 2014 Added new section on Pulau Seraya, Indonesia

19 Feb 2014 Added 30 fish to specieslist

17 Feb 2014 Added new sections on Ko Phayam and Ko Lanta

16 Feb 2014 Added ‘Rough and Ready’ new sections on Ko Bulon Lay and environs

15 Feb 2014 Added ‘Rough and Ready’ new section on Pulau Sipadan

13 Feb 2014 Added ‘Rough and Ready’ new section on Pulau Malbul

12 Feb 2014 Added new sections on Ko Rawi and Tarutao Park

11 Feb 2014 Added “Trip 1” snorkel boat trip to the ‘Lipe Environs’ page

10 Feb 2014 Added new section on Ko Adang

22 Dec 2013 Added new section on Tunku Abduk Rahman Park

18 Dec 2013 Added 10 new fish to specieslist

11 Dec 2013 Added new section on Pulau Kapas

26 Nov 2013 Added 120 new fish to specieslist

10 Nov 2013 Added ‘summary’  version of  Koh Tarutao

5 Nov 2013 – Added new section on Surin Islands

1 Nov 2013 – Updated Koh Ngai, Koh Kradan, Koh Mook

– – – –